The science behind your team’s performance.

Prepared especially for Sample

How to use this report

The goal of this report is to help you and your team create a high performing culture. We have broken the report into two pieces, representing the two major components of a high performing team: WILL and SKILL.

Section 1: WILL

High performing cultures begin with a surprisingly simple building block: your team’s why. Why you work affects how well you work. In this section we explore how you can increase your team’s will to work, by supporting the right reasons for working.

Section 2: SKILL

Achieving the highest levels of performance requires not only the skills to get a job done, but also the skills to continuously improve how you work. This section will help you structure your team’s work in a way that enables continuous improvement.

Section 1: WillUnderstanding your team’s motives

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Discover more about the counter-intuitive science behind great cultures. Our book, Primed to Perform, builds on over a century of academic thinking and our own original research. You’ll learn how to build cultures like the world’s most iconic companies, from Apple to Starbucks to Southwest.

There are six basic reasons why people work - and they are not created equal. The three direct motives (play, purpose, and potential) strengthen performance, while the three indirect motives (emotional pressure, economic pressure, and inertia) weaken it. In environments that maximize the first three and minimize the last three, individuals exhibit those hard-to-measure but highly coveted traits of creativity, problem-solving, persistence, and collaboration. This phenomenon is what we call total motivation, or ToMo for short.

ToMo Benchmarks

Total motivation is measured on a scale of -100 to 100. If your factor is positive, you have more direct motives than indirect ones. If your factor is negative, you have more indirect motives than positive ones. In order to better understand your team’s total motivation factor or ToMo, we have placed it alongside benchmark averages taken from 30 different industries and 20 different job types or functions.

By Industry
By Function
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Understand

ToMo is the common magic among the organizations we all admire. Fortunately for the rest of us, it is possible to improve a team’s total motivation, creating higher levels of performance. Different industries and functions have naturally different levels of ToMo due to the nature of the work. Compare your team’s ToMo to the scores for similar industries and functions.

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Discuss

  • Take a moment to brainstorm a list of the highest performing cultures among big companies. What do they have in common?
  • What are aspects of your own team’s industry or functions that might lead to higher ToMo?
  • Often great organizational cultures have a mission that matters. Understanding this mission can impact your team’s purpose motive leading to higher ToMo. What is your organization’s mission? Why does that matter? What role does your team play in that mission?
  • Together, set an aspirational ToMo factor goal for the team.

Your ToMo Factor

Understanding your team’s six motives

Direct Motives

Play

You are motivated by the work itself. Play occurs when you engage in an activity because you enjoy it.

Your factor
Benchmark range
91
NeutralStrengthens Performance

Discuss

  • Play drives performance when a sense of curiosity and wonder fosters self-directed learning and experimentation. Discuss scenarios where the team is able to explore new ways of doing things or experimenting.
  • How does the team currently encourage an environment of learning and teaching?
Learn More

Purpose

You’re motivated by the direct outcome of the work. You may or may not enjoy the work you do, but you value it’s impact.

Your factor
Benchmark range
100
NeutralStrengthens Performance

Discuss As a group, consider the following questions:

  • How do we define our team's mission? Who benefits from our work and what impact does it make on the organization?
  • Who are our customers and how can we develop a close connection with them?
  • Do we have the resources and degrees of freedom to do our work at our very best?
Learn More

Potential

You do the work because it will indirectly lead to something you believe is important. For example, you may or may not find play or purpose in the work, but you believe it will lead to a more interesting job in the future.

Your factor
Benchmark range
95
NeutralStrengthens Performance

Discuss As a group, consider the following questions:

  • What does it mean to do our work exceptionally well?
  • What skills or capabilities do we want to be the world’s best at?
  • What does it mean to grow in our current roles?
Learn More

Indirect Motives

Emotional Pressure

You perform the work due to an emotional pressure like disappointment, guilt, or peer pressure. You’re no longer working because you value the work itself.

Your factor
Benchmark range
8
NeutralWeakens Performance

Discuss As a group, consider the following questions:

  • Do we encourage each other to be our authentic selves at work?
  • What are some ways we could improve how we encourage each other?
  • Have we created an environment of judgment or an environment of support?
Learn More

Economic Pressure

You perform the work in order to gain a reward or avoid a punishment.

Your factor
Benchmark range
8
NeutralWeakens Performance

Discuss

  • What type of rewards are used as motivation for the team? Do they work?
  • List some ways that a punishment may cause a team member to feel forced to do their work.
Learn More

Inertia

You don’t know why you’re doing the activity. You’re doing the work today because you did it yesterday.

Your factor
Benchmark range
29
NeutralWeakens Performance

Discuss

  • What could cause inertia in your workplace? Common causes are the inability to get things done, or the inability to change how things work.
Learn More

Section 2: SkillHow to drive performance

How does total motivation drive performance?

A performance cycle helps individuals identify skills and become more adept at improving performance. The more your team feels equipped to complete the performance cycle, the higher your team’s total motivation will be.

Understanding Performance Cycles

Step 1

Theorize

In this stage we develop a hypothesis on how and why an action will lead to the desired outcome or impact. A theory connects the cause and the effect of your work. Without a theory, it is very difficult to perform at the highest levels.

Your factor
Strongly DisagreeStrongly Agree

Understand

This diagram shows the average of your team’s response to the following statements:
  • I have enough context to understand what it means to be good in my job.
  • I have full ownership for a complete piece of work.

Discuss

  • What does it mean to be good at your job?
  • How does the team have impact and create value?
  • How do we give people ownership over a meaningful piece of work, so that they can develop theories of success, and test whether they work?

Step 2

Ideate

At this stage in the performance cycle we look for ideas to increase impact.

Your factor
Strongly DisagreeStrongly Agree

Understand

This diagram shows the average of your team’s response to the following statements:
  • I have opportunities to learn and improve my skills.
  • I have access to resources that provide information, inspiration, and ideas on how to improve my work.

Discuss

  • How does the team currently learn and improve its skills?
  • What are some of the tools that are currently in place to encourage learning?
  • How do we expect our people to find inspiration to generate new ideas?

Step 3

Plan

Once we have generated many ideas, we will next have to prioritize those ideas so that we focus on the best ones for this point in time.

Your factor
Strongly DisagreeStrongly Agree

Understand

This diagram shows the average of your team’s response to the following statements:
  • I have flexibility in how I do my work.
  • I have enough information, data, and context to effectively prioritize my time in my work.
  • I can prioritize my time to focus more on things I do well versus things I don't do well.

Discuss

  • Does the team have enough information to gauge the impact, costs, and risks, associated with its ideas?
  • Does the team have the time, support, and access to explore big ideas?
  • Is the team able to prioritize its time so that people can focus on using their strengths instead of their weaknesses?

Step 4

Perform

At this stage in the performance cycle we conduct the work while driving experiments that test the prioritized ideas.

Your factor
Strongly DisagreeStrongly Agree

Understand

This diagram shows the average of your team’s response to the following statements:
  • I have the support and resources I need to remove or overcome obstacles in my work.
  • I am free to experiment with ideas for how to improve my work, even when they require support from others.

Discuss

  • How can your team increase the efficiency and effectiveness of its daily work?
  • What kind of support is in place to help remove obstacles when they occur?

Step 5

Reflect

At this stage in the performance cycle we analyze outcomes to understand where the process is working well and where it needs improvement.

Your factor
Strongly DisagreeStrongly Agree

Understand

This diagram shows the average of your team’s response to the following statements:
  • My role is designed to help me understand how well I’m doing without having to ask others.
  • I have a reasonable workload that leaves with me enough time to reflect.
  • I am able to see the impact that my own work has on others.

Discuss

  • How often does the team reflect on performance and the execution of ideas?
  • How well is your team achieving its mission? How do you know?

Going forward

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Learning

Too often great cultures feel like magic. While most leaders believe culture is critical to success, few know how to build one or sustain it over time. In their revolutionary book Primed to Perform, Lindsay McGregor and Neel Doshi show you how to do just that. The result: higher sales, more loyal customers, and more passionate employees.

Habits

Determine how frequently the team will take the survey going forward. Managing culture, like managing finances, is a continuous process. Take this team survey on a regular basis, every six to twelve months. After you measure your team's ToMo, use the report to identify room for improvement, prioritize actions, and set an aspirational ToMo goal.

If you found this survey helpful and would like to send it to another team please click here.

Get Help

To get the latest in the science of total motivation, and join the community of people who are building high performing cultures, follow us on LinkedIn, follow us on Instagram, and follow us on twitter.

For technical support email support@vegafactor.com.